Saturday, April 11, 2009

A dog, a bike rack, and a camera

Who could possibly resist the sweet bronze statue of Dirty Biter, one of La Conner's most famous canine residents? Well, I simply couldn't; I was mesmerized by the engaging replica that I encountered during my stroll through the quaint, colorful streets of La Conner. As the story has been told, Dirty Biter was everyone's most beloved dog in the small, waterfront town, and his favorite hangout was a First Street watering hole where a bar stool was especially reserved just for him. Unfortunately, Dirty Biter's life came to an abrupt end in a brutal dog fight in 1982. Hence, a life-sized bronze statue was made in his honor and now sits snugly on a metal bench next to the tavern he so often visited. 

So as I said, I was mesmerized by this piece of art and couldn't quite take my eyes off his life-like image. As I began to step away, my eyes still glued to that protruding tongue hanging from his smiling mouth, I neglected to see the bicycle rack in front of me. Suddenly I found myself teetering on top of the rack, suspended by a screw that was extending from one end and had snagged my pants. It held me prisoner as I squirmed helplessly trying to free myself from the sharp weapon that was ripping my pants and cutting into my skin. To no avail, I was unable to escape. Suddenly I heard a crash and watched helplessly as my camera shattered on the ground in front of me. My travel buddy stood next to me, frozen in space, watching in shock as the camera settled onto the hard, stone surface...

Yep...here's the result of my mishap...a camera that I was unable to use for the remainder of my trip. Upon my return home, the doc looked it over, removed the smashed lens cap thereby revealing the shattered polarizing filter. My immediate thought was whether or not my favorite and oh-so-costly lens had been scratched and whether or not the camera still functioned...
After minor surgery to remove the filter, I reattached the lens and tried it out. It seems to work fine although it squeaks a bit when the autofocus is engaged. The doc suggested to keep on using it. Only time will tell what the true extent of its injuries are...
What lessons can be learned from this rather comical and quite possibly expensive mishap? Always put your camera away in its shockproof camera bag and for heaven's sake, look where you're going!

13 comments:

Bryan said...

Oops! It looks like the filter saved the lens, which is good because I just know I will drop my camera one day, but I always keep a filter on the lens. You may not have been able to use the camera for the rest of the trip, but at least you got that great photo of Dirty Biter!

Jeff Phillips said...

Hey, Linnea - I don't know which is more meaningful, the tale of Dirty Biter, or the crash-boom-bang of the bike-rack and camera. Your travel tales are interesting, and I enjoy reading them. - Jeff

Sharon said...

I will remember your story because I am not known for my gracefulness and I would hate for this to happen to my camera! Glad it wasn't a total loss.

Mariz said...

Ouch...that must suck big time! But though we try as best we can to take care of our beloved cameras, accidents do happen and there's no telling when that could strike. I do hope you didn't get hurt badly and you're alright now, that is more important. Take care...

HotSauce said...

I'm glad the lens is hanging in there, so far… and it's a great story! But I want to hear more about the concerned delivery girl and the peals of laughter that immediately followed!

Love your Dirty Biter photo

Ebie (The Main-Ingredient) said...

Sigh. I hope you still have the warranty. But on the brighter side, I love how you compose your photos of the doc. I do not like bad news, and i was hoping for a good one, that's why I came here first only to find out about our dear lens. Oh, well I could be clumsy sometimes, and accidents happen, and it is quite a lesson learned. Take it easy.....

Oz Girl said...

Oh my, glad to hear your polarizing filter took the brunt of the hit.

I've been browsing through your Pacific NW photos, so beautiful up there! My hubby is in Renton this month (business) but he had to work last w/e, and this w/e he is sick, so he hasn't had much time to explore. Next w/e will be his last, so fingers crossed he isn't working or sick, and can get out and about!

Chako-chan said...

I am so sorry to hear what happened. But when something like that happens, many Japanese feel that the precious thing sacrificed itself to protect you. I think the camera loves you as much as you love it, and it has become even more precious. When we look at things with respect, everything--animals, plants, stones, tools, etc.--seems to have its soul and communicate with you. Things really could have been worse. Would you try to put aloe vera and/or Vitamin E on your punctured skin?

I love your photos. The great dog Dirty Biter reminds me of Chuuken Hachiko (whose statue sits in front of Shibuya Station).

Happy Easter!

E. Floyd said...

Sorry to hear about the mishap, hopefully the lens will continue function. If not you could always send it in to get cleaned and serviced, which may help with the noise of the lens.

I like the dog statue and understand your interest. Have a good week.

Cheryl Ann said...

Oh, gosh, Linnea! I thought I was the clumsy one! I'm always tripping over the kids at school and, with my leg nerve damage, last week a kid moved his chair out just as I walked by and I went flying! Phew! Good thing I didn't fall down. I'm so sorry about your camera. How are YOU doing? Are you okay?

postcardsfromwildwood said...

Oh, Linnea, I'm so sorry to hear about your lens. I hope it will still function properly. Interesting story about Dirty Bliter.
Janice.

Connie said...

Nice picture of the dog art but sorry about your lense. When I go walking, I put the strap around my neck just in case I trip and drop it. I could fall on my face though, but hopefully not.

chrome3d said...

That fine tool is essential for anyone repairing a camera! HAH HAH. Good luck with the second life of the lens.