Monday, November 12, 2012

Napa Wineries

I couldn't resist going back to Napa one more time in November to view the autumn colors before they disappeared, so along with my two traveling companions, I headed north and started ticking off places on my itinerary. 

Our first stop was the Vista Point just south of Napa College. It provides beautiful 360 degree views of the surrounding countryside. What really caught my eye, however, was this amazing piece of artwork by Gino Miles prominently displayed at the top of the knoll: our friendly grape crusher busy at work...

Next stop was Darioush Winery: a spectacular Persian-inspired home to some rather expensive Bordeaux-style estate wines. Not being a wine connoisseur, I was more interested in the amazing architecture of this rather unique yet splendid winery; it's something you really don't expect to find in the Napa Valley.

I've visited quite a few wineries in my time and I have to say that this one is definitely worth a visit. It's impeccable in its attention to detail, both in the exterior grounds and welcoming visitor center. I'd love to come back when I'm feeling a bit more loose with my purse strings and indulge in a sampling of their wines. For now, however, these photos will have to do...










Our next stop was Trefethen Vineyards, a family-run operation just a bit west of Darioush. Supposedly this winery is the only surviving example of what was once the most common winery architecture in Napa, a three-story wooden gravity flow winery.

This particular spot seemed to be quite popular with the limousine crowd as there were several limos parked alongside the vineyards. The overall feel was much more homey than the elegant Darioush. The staff in the visitor center was very friendly and informative, and there were quite a few groups in the private tasting rooms enjoying their wines. The grounds are lovely and to get there, you follow a long tree-lined road...









Last on our stop was a little bit of Jefferson: the Monticello Winery, a collection of five vineyards owned by the Corley family. The reason for the Monticello name and architectural look is that the founder, whose family stems from Virginia, wanted to honor the most famous Virginian of all - Thomas Jefferson, so the main house is built in the Palladian style and is a rather good mini replica of the original Monticello...








Don't ask how the wines were as I didn't sample any; I was too busy with my Nikon. This was just another fun outing in the greater San Francisco Bay Area. I guess I'm lucky to live where I do!

6 comments:

Joyful said...

The sky is a stunning blue and the winery looks fabulous. I bet you had a wonderful time there.

Sinbad and I on the Loose said...

Well now you have peaked my interest. I need to break away from my Sonoma wineries and visit nextdoor Napa. That Darioush winery looks like some really good photo ops.

Cloudia said...

oh sweet! loved this



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LindyLouMac in Italy said...

What a lovely outing but I was amazed you did not even get to taste one or two wines.

Photo Cache said...

we are so lucky living in this region. so many mini getaways we could take and still be lying in our own bed at night.

i've been to napa so many times and i haven't been to any of these wineries you showed here.

kulasa said...

wow, the place looks so beautiful...the tree lined road is so inviting and the friendly grape crusher busy at work piece of art displayed atop photographed wonderfully against the blue skies as well as the succeeding shots are more than enough to satisfy this eyes...loved the virtual tour and oh what a creative shot you got in the last photo...you really are lucky to live where you do...have a great day! :)